SPEECH-LANGUAGE DISORDERS

ADULTS

SPEECH DISORDERS

STUTTERING

Stuttering usually begins during childhood and can last into adulthood. It is characterized by disruptions in the production of speech sounds. 

SPEECH SOUNDS

Issues affecting an individual's ability to physically make the appropriate sounds for communication.

Stroke and other trauma to the brain can damage an individual's ability to control the muscles necessary to speak clearly.

Includes: Apraxia, Articulation Disorder, Dysarthria

TONGUE THRUST

An imbalance in the muscles of the face causing the tongue to protrude past the teeth when swallowing, speaking or at rest.

VOICE DISORDERS

A disorder impacting the vocal cords and muscles of the throat, hurting the quality of your voice causing it to sound harsh, scratchy or hoarse.

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LANGUAGE DISORDERS

APHASIA

Results from damage to the language centers of the brain, typically from a stroke or other trauma.

 

Aphasia can impact an individual's ability to produce and understand spoken language as well as creating difficulty reading and writing.

AUDITORY PROCESSING DISORDER (APD)

An impaired ability to follow auditory information despite having normal hearing.

Symptoms include difficulty understanding speech in noisy environments, following directions and distinguishing between similar sounds.

SOCIAL LANGUAGE

Difficulty understanding and using language appropriately in social situations.

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SCHEDULE AN EVALUATION TODAY

314-968-4710

PATHWAYS TO INDEPENDENCE:

SOCIAL COLLEGE

&
ADULT EDUCATION 

The Center is a proud partner of Pathways to Independence, a Clayton-based non-profit serving adults with disabilities.

Our SLPs instruct a program focusing on participant-identified social topics: Social College.

 

Visit pathways2independence.com for more information.

COMMUNICATION TIPS

FOR  SPEAKING TO ADULTS WITH SPEECH-LANGUAGE DISORDERS

  • Keep sentences and questions short.

  • Allow extra time for responding. Don't hurry them.

  • Reduce background noises that may be distracting (TV, radio, etc.) or move to a quite area.

  • Begin the conversation with casual topics (the weather, meals). Avoid crucial messages at the beginning.

  • Talk about familiar subjects such as family members and special interests of the person.

  • Stick to a topic. Avoid quick shifts from topic to topic.​

  • Give them a moment to reminisce. Memories are important.​

  • Give them choices to ease decision making: "Do you want tea or coffee?" instead of "What do you want to drink?"

  • Be an active listener. Look for hints from eye gaze and gestures.

9835 Manchester Road

St. Louis, MO 63119

Tel. 314-968-4710

Fax. 314-968-4762

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